Wheelchair Accessible Vehicles Can Help The Disabled Travel Independently

With a wheelchair accessible vehicle, the disabled can travel independently. Getting a wheelchair accessible vehicle means choosing exactly where and whenever you wish to go, such as to the office, to work, shopping or to be outside, enjoying the sun and being leisurely. Individuals who use a wheelchair ultimately want to be able to access the world like their peers.

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Accessible Automobiles and Vehicles For The Disabled

Author: Steph Stanton

It is time to be the driver of a wheelchair accessible vehicle rather than being the passenger and being dependent on others for transportation. This is the first step in becoming independent. Getting a wheelchair accessible vehicle means choosing exactly where and whenever you wish to go, such as to the office, to work, shopping or to be outside, enjoying the sun and being leisurely. Individuals who use a wheelchair ultimately want to be able to access the world like their peers. Anything that brings them towards self-sufficiency and without assistance from others will be a great aid.

Accessible automobiles can be used by paraplegics, people with spinal cord defects, injury victims, those with severe arthritis and people with limited mobility that have restrictions with the use of their legs.

Any cars that have an automatic transmission can be changed into accessible automobiles. The process requires some installation of hand controls or portable hand controls. Once installed, either one will provide benefits to the user in the vehicle. Best of all, those without disabilities can still drive the car or van. These are simply attachments that make it easier for the disabled but not harder for the abled. The driver has a choice to use the controls or ignore them. The vehicle would still be functioning as would the pedals of the vehicle.

Handicap hand controls are simple to add on and easy to disassemble from a car or van. They fit most vehicles with an automated transmission. After a couple of minutes of tightening and screwing work on the steering wheel, gas and break petals, the hand controls are ready to be used. Hire a professional to install them if you have any hesitation. It is better pay more to assure the proper installation than for the controls to fall apart while driving. Almost any car can be a handicap vehicle.

Handicap accessible vans and/or minivans are available from Chevrolet, Chrysler, Dodge, Ford, GMC, Honda, Toyota and others. These personally customized handicap vehicles can include low floors, higher ceilings, lifts and ramps for wheelchairs, tie-downs to keep the wheelchair in place, and transfer seats. Wheelchair entry can be created on the side entry or the rear or back entry with the van. Custom made specifications can be made in accordance with your abilities. Choose more power features and remote manage items if needed. Some of these features of handicap vehicles include parking brakes that are controlled by a switch and electric wheelchair locking techniques. There are also options that have joystick steering.

Other items you should include on to a wheelchair accessible vehicle are remote controls, remote starter, and a source of communication, for example, a cell telephone. These will help improve the usability of the vehicles for the disabled persons and prepare them in case of any accidents.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/disabilities-articles/wheelchair-accessible-vehicles-can-help-the-disabled-travel-independently-2503892.html

About the Author

Read more about handicap equipment for cars and the options one might have to create a handicap vehicle. If you already have a van and need a handicap van conversion, find out the costs and choices before making that big decision. Whatever you decide, these changes will improve one’s quality of life and bring back independence.

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One Response

06.05.10

I am a C5/C6 quadriplegic and while I totally agree with the need for people with disabilities to be able to drive, I see this to be very feasible and economical for paraplegics because all they need is basic hand controls. However, it is a different story for quadriplegics like me who only have limited use of their hands. I drive my own van at home and the total cost of the conversion (excluding the cost of the van) is about 50K. I would love to be able to arrive at an airport and be able to rent an accessible van I can drive myself, but I can not imagine that any rental car company is willing to make such an investment. In addition, every quad is different and therefore needs custom driving equipment. Positioning of the wheelchair in front of the steering wheel also varies for every quad. Rental companies would have to spend time swapping and adjusting equipment depending on the quadriplegic’s specific needs, a task that could take several hours in some cases.
But regardless, I wouldn’t mind to pay a little extra for the independence I get by being able to drive myself.

Luc
disabledandproductive.com